Why do we fight?

Democracy is diseased, and Partit Nazzjonalista is the only cure left.

‘Demmna inċarċru għal-liberta`’. This was the spirit that guided our parents through the 80s. Through the violence, corruption and criminality that plagued Malta, from the burning of the times to Eddie Fenech Adami's living room to 'triq tal-barrani'.

Things have changed; while it may not be a brute force in the streets, we meet the same thugs in the thousands online, You may not be violently beaten, but your mental health is met with a verbal crowbar. All young activists face a slew of insults and threats when they find the courage to stand up to the criminals who run our country under the smirk of Joseph Muscat. Yet, one would tend to understand why many choose to step back out of fear of losing their job or being labelled and ostracised in a polarised culture that waters everything down to bi-tribal warfare out of lack of political literacy and critical thinking. But the unfortunate cyclical nature of these oppressive situations is that we are condemned to uphold them out of fear of the above.

So what can we count on if we feel like we must always enter the fight for our country muzzled with a pair of metaphorical handcuffs behind our back? This is why we elect people to represent us; to be our voice when getting up on a protest stage yourself could cost you everything. But our representative democracy doesn't stop there. We are still indebted to fight for our country when it needs us. Malta went from the country with little civic participation in protests to one which toppled a government through civil disobedience.

So what can we count on if we feel like we must always enter the fight for our country muzzled with a pair of metaphorical handcuffs behind our back? This is why we elect people to represent us; to be our voice when getting up on a protest stage yourself could cost you everything. But our representative democracy doesn't stop there. We are still indebted to fight for our country when it needs us. Malta went from the country with little civic participation in protests to one which toppled a government through civil disobedience.

Hence the few that rise and put their neck out for their ideals are vital to the health of democracy. To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson in a Maltese context, the tree of democracy must be watered with the sacrifices of activists and patriots, alongside the true statesmen and women. They run for office because they recognise the sanctity of the benches of parliament.

We are Maltese citizens, if not with a genuine interest in democracy, with interest in our national well-being, thirsty for a country that breathes opportunity to those genuinely deserving it, which values meritocracy and punishes abuse and corruption. They say prevention is better than cure, but a corrupt mafia organisation has already infected our democratic internal organs. Our country needs a bed in the ITU, and the Nationalist Party must be the front liners to rehabilitate the country.

Eve Borg Bonello

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A know-it-all that knows nothing at all - Small chance I might happen to mention politics in passing 🇲🇹🇪🇺